Aftermath

It’s a week on from the destruction of the kingfisher and sand martin nests by the mink. During this time I’ve had several discussions with the landowner and the local Wildlife Trust which has resulted in permission being granted to trap the mink. On Friday evening I placed a trap in an area I’d seen the female mink moving through regularly, and on Saturday morning I returned to be met with shrill distress calls emanating from the area around the trap, as I approached the trap there was frantic calling from the undergrowth and I saw three juvenile mink kits being led away from the vicinity of the trap by the adult. Part of the cloth cover I’d put over the trap to create the impression of a cave was chewed and through the hole I could see a juvenile mink inside the trap.

Inline with GWCT guidelines on mink trapping, the juvenile was quickly dispatched using an air pistol and I’m now left with the knowledge that the female has at least 3 healthy & mobile juveniles in tow that she will be foraging for. Intervening in an ecosystem is seldom straightforward, and unfortunately there are no easy solutions to problems like the mink.

As for the kingfishers, on my last two visits to the site I’ve only seen the adult male on the branch opposite the nest site, where he has perched for a few seconds before resuming his flight upstream. At this point it looks like the kingfishers have abandoned the nest bank, presumably to try and find a safer site elsewhere, there is also no sign of the Sand Martins.