Return of the King

After the dramatic events of last year, this year has already proven challenging for the Trent Kingfishers. Over the winter the river has flooded repeatedly, causing more erosion of the banks than I’ve seen in the ten years I’ve been visiting the river. As a result of this the kingfisher bank has lost at least a metre from its face, removing all trace of previous kingfisher burrows.

On March 14th I first saw a pair of kingfishers checking out the bank, however that night it rained heavily, the river flooded and a week later the snow arrived, after which there was no further sign of the kingfishers at the bank.

Although I saw kingfishers as I walked the river, they were alone, appearing to have reverted back to their individual territories throughout the period of snow and sub zero temperatures. Finally the weather improved and the milder sunny weather on the 6th April seems to have been what the Kingfishers were waiting for, as on my return to the bank on Sunday morning I could see the start of a new burrow and a pair of birds sitting on a branch opposite the bank.

Later in the day I carefully positioned myself opposite the bank and watched the kingfishers digging into the bank.

I’m afraid to report that there are still mink present along this stretch of the river and despite my efforts to keep this stretch clear by trapping, the mink are ignoring the traps.

I really don’t know how things will go this year, despite the mink and the floods, the kingfishers still managed to fledge their first brood last year, and hopefully, this years breeding season will be less eventful.

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